Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Trout Fishing?

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2

    Default Trout Fishing?

    I'm looking for somewhere to go trout fishing in Anchorage or the Valley. I don't have a boat, so I fish from shore. I've tried Canoe and Irene Lake, but all I ever catch are fingerlings. I want to catch some decent size trout that I dont have to release. I'm fishing for my dinner, not just for fun. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Member Theone2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    The Valley,Alaska
    Posts
    229

    Default

    Try fishing in the early morning or in late evening. That is when the fish start to come to shore. Loberg is a good lake if you want some rainbows. I can't guarantee that you will catch anything but this is the best advice I have. I don't have a boat either, so I know what its like.
    Good Luck

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    106

    Red face

    I'm in the same 'boat,' without the boat.

    Can I ask what you were using at Canoe and Irene Lake? I've gone a couple nights a week (including Long Lake) and havent' caught anything. I have tried some vibrax spinners and spoons, and those white wiggly looking things that came with my walmart rod. But I haven't caught squat.

    I know you can't keep anything from Long Lake but a guy that I talked to was using a float tube and he said that lake has the big ones. I'm eventually going to get a float tube or canoe but right now it's hard to spend the money on something because I'm such a novice.

    **EDIT**
    I just added this pic of that wiggly thing I was talking about. That and the hook came with a pole I bought at walmart. I've upgraded the rod and reel but I'm still clueless about how to rig the proper gear. Yes those are two swivels. Don't ask. I don't know what I'm doing.
    I did read enough to understand why it's nicer for the fishies to use a single hook, so I've put small signle hooks (siwash) on my vibrax spinners and "smashed" the barb. But other than that I've just been dinking around trying to figure out what to do. either way I haven't cought anything yet. I'd like to do some C&R but ultimately I'd like to eat something.

  4. #4
    Member power drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Down wind of 2 Glaciers
    Posts
    1,088

    Default

    Sorry but that mister twister isn't hooked up right nor is it really all that good for what you are trying for. Pike will take it. Pull it off the hook start the hook tip at the fat end of the mister twister and push the hook onto it till it gets up to the lead head. They work more on things down south like bass, walleye, etc. Don't let MallWart teach you how to fish. Fish really get a lot of stuff threw at them and they get smart. Those big swivels got to go. Its better to Tie on a barrel swivel to your main line and from that tie on a piece of mono line for a leader 2-4 FT and tie that to you lure. If your spin casting I'd use some small spinners like Mepps,& panther martins. Really if you want to learn fishing on your own get some books or look on line. Its pretty easy to find all the info you need to help. It would be worth you going on a charter fishing trip and use it as a class for learning and having fun. Good luck!

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2

    Default

    ePatrick, I was using salmon eggs when I caught the fingerlings. From my experience fishing in Montana and Wyoming, when you're fishing in a lake it's usually better to use bait. Spinners work great in rivers and streams. I've been fishing my whole life, but fishing up here is sooo much different than back home. I'm trying to figure out Alaska fishing.

  6. #6

    Default

    10-4 on it being rigged wrong (epatrick), and what's going on with those snap swivels? Head over to 3-rivers or sportsmans and get started off right. These fish can be tough enough when your tackle is correct let alone.....
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  7. #7
    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Pole, Ak
    Posts
    241

    Default

    I'm new to Alaska and have a lot to learn. However, I've been fishing for most of my 46 years. Several years ago I got turned on to fly fishing in Washington state and haven't looked back! It can be expensive initially but is worth every penny. After ice out this Spring, I struggled initially as the water was cold and the insect hatches were light. I am presently fishing interior lakes. A few weeks ago chironomids, damsel nymphs, and dragon fly nymphs hatches came off in hordes. These hatches are still ongoing and my catch rates have gone through the roof. Lakes that I thought were dead are not. While I'm not finding a lot of rainbows (when I do, they're small), I'm getting char to the tune of 15-20 a trip. They are hammering olive damsel patterns and black dragon fly patterns in size 10, fished near the bottom in 10-12' of water.

    Having said this, I would recommend you scrap the bait at this time of year....especially if you're seeing a lot of insect activity. Try a casting bubble with nymphs, or at the very least, black or olive wooly buggers or wooly worms. Adjust your leader after the float to match water depth. Use split shot as necessary. Make your cast, allow it to sink, and begin your retrieve. Sometimes the fish want a "low and slow" retrieve, or maybe a fast erratic retrieve where you stop often. You would have to experiment around, and every day can be different. This can be done with your existing spinning gear.

    While bait will certainly work, there is too much natural food in the water this time of year. Other folks at the lakes I'm fishing are struggling with bait, while I'm doing well by matching the natural food source. Makes sense.....they only have limited time to gorge themselves on the real thing!

    Just my two cents and something to think about! Good luck.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Thanks for the input to my questions, I sent some PM's. Livvy, sorry to hijack your thread!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    83

    Talking

    Sand lake will be your best bet! There is some nice fish in there to be had. Especially rainbows. I've taken my nephews out there and they have blast catching fish there. Though there are alot of fingerlings,if you can cast out far enough you'll pick up 15-20 inch range bows out of there. Good eating!!Also the Kepler and Bradley lakes in Palmer always produce good size fish also. 20 inch plus fish there. Never been skunked there before.

  10. #10
    Guest
    Guest

    Default

    @Hunter530 those are some nice bows man!

  11. #11
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Interior
    Posts
    2,101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FishAddictAK View Post
    @Hunter530 those are some nice bows man!
    They are ridiculous. Was that sand lake or kepler bradley?

  12. #12
    Member Theone2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    The Valley,Alaska
    Posts
    229

    Default

    I could of been both lakes. Both of the lakes have huge bows in them.

  13. #13
    Member Theone2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    The Valley,Alaska
    Posts
    229

    Default

    A guy not too long ago posted a huge rainbow that he got in Sand Lake and it was a little bit bigger and fat than those ones.
    But those are still some great fish! Nice catch!

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    83

    Thumbs up

    These were caught at the Kepler Bradley lakes. Both me and my brother landed these within seconds apart on fly rods. Made a heck of a dinner for the family!

  15. #15
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Float tubes work for some on area lakes.
    Local fishing shop is good source for info on terminal tackle.
    Good luck.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    283

    Default

    Nice looking fish indeed!!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •