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Thread: curing roe question

  1. #1

    Default curing roe question

    now that salmon is upon us, i would like to cure some roe. the recipes i am trying tell you to separate the eggs from the membrane, discarding all membrane. wow, easier said than done. anyone have any tips for this part of the process?

  2. #2
    Member northriver21's Avatar
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    Unless your curing single eggs why would they tell you do do that????

    I think what you need to do is to separate the membrane on the back side enough to get the cure in there real good. Do not damage or discard it.


    Just make sure you coat the membrane side as well as in between the clusters on the non membrane side.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    My recommendation. Go to 3 bears and purchase 1 bottle of Pro-Cure for ~ $7.00 then follow the simplified instructions (except use 2x the amount). Done and the stuff flat out works.

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    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    Default curing salmon roe links

    Gogoalie posted about curing salmon roe last summer...here is the link

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ght=salmon+roe

    Here is the website that he posted that shows how to do it quick and easy. I tried the recipe and the roe came out excellent!

    http://blue_moon.typepad.com/blue_lo...09/post-6.html

    This should help!
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

  5. #5

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    yeah, that thread for the blue moon recipe is the one i want to try, as the results look like what i am familiar with eating. the issue i have is getting past step two, the separating egg from membrane. absolutely not happening with the batch i tried last night, the eggs just stayed in clumps, and broke if i tried to seperate.
    lujon, what is in this miracle cure you speak of? any of the off-the-shelf curing products i have seen are mostly salt, maybe some msg or other preservatives i am not too into.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    hmmm, I should pay more attention to what forum I am typing in....

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    Member northriver21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    hmmm, I should pay more attention to what forum I am typing in....
    Whoa, I didnt see that coming. I guess it makes more sense now.

    Carry on...I have no experiance "curing" row for that purpose.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtysteev View Post
    now that salmon is upon us, i would like to cure some roe. the recipes i am trying tell you to separate the eggs from the membrane, discarding all membrane. wow, easier said than done. anyone have any tips for this part of the process?
    Since this is the "pantry" section, I'm going to assume you're wanting to make caviar rather than bait.

    We make a lot of it, and have found an easy way to separate single eggs from the membrane-

    Go to a cooking store and pick up a round deepfry basket if you don't already have one. I think I paid $8 for the last one I bought. You could just as well use a piece of 1/4" mesh hardware cloth, but the deep fry basket has two little hooks opposite the handle so you can nest it down into a bowl while it hangs from the rim.

    Now just use it like a cheese grater to gently "scrape" the eggs from the membrane. You won't get them all, but you'll end up with a whole lot of loose eggs in the bowl.

    You didn't ask for it, but here's our recipe for finishing the job and coming out with excellent caviar.

    Prep your brine my mixing a cup of salt per quart of water. It take some stirring and time to get it all dissolved. We generally make up two quarts, but for big batches of caviar will make as much as a gallon.

    Brining time varies with the salmon species. The commercial caviar is so danged salty we can hardly taste the eggs, but it's intended to last a long time in storage. Most comes in at 3-3.5% salt content. Not for us, and besides the caviar doesn't last long in our house. The caviar we make comes in at 1.8-2% salt, and is a whole lot easier on the tongue.

    Here's the soak times by species: Pinks and reds- 6 minutes, silvers and dogs- 8 minutes, kings- 10 minutes. That's all! Stir the eggs gently once in awhile, but have a colander handy for draining once the time is up.

    Drain in a colander and rinse with fresh water to remove surface salt. Now balance the colander on top of a bowl and cover with plastic wrap, then stick it in the refer overnight to stabilize.

    In the morning the eggs are going to be sticking together pretty good. You want them loose for caviar. Easy fix. Gently stir in 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of olive oil.

    This low-salt stuff only keeps about a week in the refrigerator. It's hard for us to make it last that long, though.

    Rather than trying to freeze finished caviar for winter (it continues to oxidize and get a fishy taste), we freeze whole skeins of eggs in ziplocs after squeezing the air out. Any time you want just thaw the skeins gently in the refer, and make another batch. But after the eggs have been frozen they soak up salt a lot easier. Cut the brining time for each species by 2 minutes when working with roe that has been frozen.

  9. #9

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    thanks, all valuable information!
    thanks to you too lujon, if i need bait i now know what to do also.

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