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Thread: Coyote Questions.

  1. #1

    Default Coyote Questions.

    I know that there are some folks here that know a lot about coyotes and I know little, so here goes...

    Last evening about 22:00 (10:00pm) I was outside and heard some rustling near my chicken coop. I thought I was hearing a deer walking around as I have heard often in the past. A few seconds later I watched a coyote, about 40-50 lbs, trot past me about 20 feet away. It never saw me. Recently I have had to repair the chicken coop door because something pushed in the screen, but it did not get in. Tonight I was driving home and I saw a coyote cross the street in front of me less than 1/8 mile from my house. People here in my neck of TN have seen coyotes often but this is the first time for me in 2 years of living here. I live in city limits on the outskirts of a subdivision, in a wooded area, next to a cow pasture and more woods. Deer, turkeys, squirrel, and raccoons are all over this area and frequent my yardin fact, I have a deer feeder with corn in my front yard that automatically throws out corn 3 times a day and brings the animals in for my family to see.

    I have German Sheppard Dogs, an 80 lb female and a 135 lb male. I know that if they got into a doggie brawl, by sheer weight Id bet on my dogs. From personal experience I can tell you that both dogs can bite hard playing, especially Moose the 135 lb male. Neither of my dogs have any fighting experience other than play fighting with each other. Belle, the female, can bite painfully hard even when playing and Moose has bone-crushing power even when holding back and being tender.

    How much concern do I need to have that, if they tangle, my dogs will get injured? Is a coyote prone to confront a domesticated dog as big as my dogs? What time of the day are they most active? Are coyotes pack animals or are they lone actors? Since Ive seen 2 (perhaps only 1) in two days but never before is this indicative of the future? Since I live in city limits and there are houses within 200 feet from my house I know that all of my firearms are too powerful to use within city limits (223 to 45-70 in the rifle category and 10mm to 45 in the handgun category). ..so any suggestions?

    Lots of questions since I have no experience with coyotes. Thanks for any input!

    MyTime

  2. #2
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    I would say the 10MM or 45 with a personal protection hollow point, or get a 22 LR or a 410 with buckshot
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    If them coyotes tangle up with your dogs, your dogs probably gonna get hurt, depending on the number of coyotes and how tough your dog really is. Coyotes bite for a livin. Is your dog a real biter/fighter? If not, vet bills run up fast. Coyotes generally hunt single of doubles, but I have saw 8 or 9 running together in my days in Wyoming. If you saw coyotes twice, you will see them again and again, until you educte them with a .22 round somewhere 'tween the nose and the tail. Basically hit them anywhere and they die, now, sooner, or later.
    Here in Alaska I have (been surprised that I ) saw coyotes out in western Alaska west of the Nush River (got one!), in the southern Wrangle Mountains HARRASSING A SMALL SHE-WOLF, and throughout southcentral AK and the Kenai Peninsula, especially in the years when the rabbit/hare population is high (and this is not one of those years, yet). Some say Mat-Su valley is over-run with 'em. Coyotes I mean.

    Coyotes, Cockroaches, and Pike are hard to be rid of once they get comfortable popoulations. Similar to some forum members.
    I remember a big thread on Coyotes in the hunting forum w/i the last year.

    Ahhhhhh...others may disagree.
    dennis

  4. #4
    Member highestview's Avatar
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    My exxperience with coyotes is in a similar situation. I work as an engineer tech doing well testing, so I work in all the neighborhoods at the edges of town or outside of our big city (Anchorage). I know of two neighborhoods where I have consistently seen coyotes (Bear Valley and Hiland Road). Both places have rabbit populations and some ptarmigan in Hiland Road.

    I've talked to homeowners about it and they never seem to say that thay are confrontational or cause trouble. They do seem to be very bold (stupid maybe?) and will get very close to houses, roads, pets... I was hiking in a trail that starts in the Hiland Road trail and saw one come over a ridge less than 100 yards from me. I did my best to yip like a coyote and he stopped to look at me like nothing worried him. Then he just wandered off. It was interesting. Keep in mind that Alaska has nice small game populations that keep coyotes and lynx well fed and black bears that do cause disappearances of pets from time to time. That being said, I'm not sure if your coyotes down there are more desperate for food and would be more aggressive. I also dont know how many housecats have fallen to coyotes that get blamed on bears so I'm not sure how agressive they are here.

    I do know that coyotes are hunters/scavengers so (like bears) if they find an easy food source, like your chicken coop, they are prone to coming around more and becoming problems.

    Coyotes are semi pack animals. They mostly stay alone but sometimes gather up to hunt or just 'catch up.' It's weird. They seem to like to call to each other and sometimes join up. I've heard them do it and then seen them in pairs later in the day. They make every dog in the Hiland Road neighborhood start howling and barking back when they do. It's really eerie.

    If he's found your chicken coop, I'd say get rid of him immediately. I'd use a 22lr for my neighbors sake. Even a trap might be a good idea. Get a trapping license if you do that.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    I'm sure that discharging a firearm would be illegal but I would just let the neighbors know the deal and let them know that you are going to dipatch a trouble maker and that they might hear a shot or two and not to worry. The 22 will take care of them in short order.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i think your dogs should act as a deterent but if they fight with one or more coyotes they will be hurt. once visited your place will be a source of food until it is gone or the coyotes are dead.
    happy trails.
    jh

  7. #7

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    Maybe a local trapper can help you out.

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    Try one of the current production .25 cal air rifles. Very little noise and they should be put to the task of dispatching your porblem.

  9. #9

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    I'd like to shoot the thing but I'd also like, even more, to stay out of jail. The idea that coyotes like to meet up with and hunt with partners is something I didn't know. I am concerned about one of them scrapping with my dogs (professional fighter versus an inexperienced amateur).

    My last experience with an air rifle was when I was a kid in the 60's and early 70's. It was a Crossman 760 and that particular rifle would not be up to this task. I just did a quick search and found this: http://www.airgunwarehouseinc.com/py-2050.html Any ideas about this? I see some nice ones for 400+ but that will cut into my reloading funds...perhaps necessary.

    Two more questions: 1. If not sick how much concern should I have that it will attack my wife or 18 year old kid? -and- 2. if I put an air rifle round into it's chest how likely is it to come after me (the need for a real handgun)?

    You guys are awesome. Thanks for the information.

    MyTime

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    Quote Originally Posted by MyTime View Post
    I'd like to shoot the thing but I'd also like, even more, to stay out of jail. The idea that coyotes like to meet up with and hunt with partners is something I didn't know. I am concerned about one of them scrapping with my dogs (professional fighter versus an inexperienced amateur).

    My last experience with an air rifle was when I was a kid in the 60's and early 70's. It was a Crossman 760 and that particular rifle would not be up to this task. I just did a quick search and found this: http://www.airgunwarehouseinc.com/py-2050.html Any ideas about this? I see some nice ones for 400+ but that will cut into my reloading funds...perhaps necessary.

    Two more questions: 1. If not sick how much concern should I have that it will attack my wife or 18 year old kid? -and- 2. if I put an air rifle round into it's chest how likely is it to come after me (the need for a real handgun)?

    You guys are awesome. Thanks for the information.

    MyTime
    That is a dandy little air gun, it should terminate any coyote, as long as its close, I wouldn't shoot past 30,40 yards or so. if youa re seeing him at 10-15 yards, hit him with a pallet from that and you have one dead coyote. hit him high in the shoulder and he shouldn't run and die on your neighbors property. if you do get that gun, it'll make a dandy rabbit gun too! great for beginners also.
    Deadly accurate.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

  11. #11
    Member Bullwinkle50's Avatar
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    Mytime,

    I was raised in Kansas hunting coyotes. Dad ran trail hounds, knew others that used sight dogs (greyhouhds), but i preferred a rifle. It usually takes 2 dogs that know what they are doing to be effective against a coyote. The coyote is a very efficient killer and I would be concerned about my single pet tangling with one on his own no matter how big my pet is. I have never seen one act aggressive towards people and are usually very skiddish around people. Keep your coop strong and a good air rifle handy.

    Randy

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    Another thing to consider is that if you're feeding corn (and/or other grains) to deer in your yard, you can be sure that deer is not all that is attracted to the feeder. I'd bet that your yard has seen a huge increase in small rodents (I'm thinking mice, rats, chipmunks, squirrels & maybe even rabbits) all of which would be a strong attractant for coyote(s). Another thing to think about is that you're probably only gonna get 1 shot at one during daylight. If it isn't killed, you'll have to put in lots of nighttime hours to see any more. With the exception of the one associated with the roadrunner, they are probably the wiliest animal in the country (wolf would be the only exception).

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    Down in Oregon about 4 years ago, my wifes folks were starting to have coyote problems. A pack of 5 or so lived in a wooded creek bottom 3/4 mile away, and they started coming around more and more often and getting into things. So my father in law, who happens to have a big wolf hybrid dog doesn't worry about it too much. They just let him run them off and he comes back unscathed. One day just before dark, they saw a lone coyote out on the property, so they let out the dog to go after it. With the inlaws watching this the whole time. This coyote was acting playful like, "hey big boy, want some of this", being submissive and was bouncing around like a puppy wanting to play. The dog and coyote sniff and run around playfully for a minute, then she leads him into the bushes where the rest of the pack was waiting and they tore his ***** up! Literrally!! This 130pound dog just got his lunch practically ate by those coyotes. The vet bills were not pretty. After that, the guns came out, the local were talked to about a game plan and it was on!
    If you see one and it doesn't appear too concerned, I say you best get to killing it sooner than later.

  14. #14
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Find a local trapper. You'll make his day.

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    Your dogs should be fine unless you send them after the coyote. Then they are probably going to get more than either you or they want. Doubtful either the dogs or the coyote will die, but there wil probably be some serious vet bills as has already been mentioned. Small dogs and cats are a different matter. Coyotes are opportunistic and will kill any small animal when they have a chance. Coyotes seldom if ever will challenge a human unless they are sick or cornered. That's one of the reasons they are so succesful. They stay away from any contact in which they might get get hurt. Once established it is virtually impossible to totally eliminate coyotes. Poison is so indiscrimnate and in some places is illegal. Widespread trapping and gunning is only temporarily succesful. Shooting the one or two you see is probably pretty sketchy in town. They are hard to see on your terms unless you call or trap. The best solution is getting in contact with a trapper as has already been mentioned. Even so, it will probably only be temporary, but at least it will give you some peace of mind around the house. Your best bet is to follow the basic rules for bears. Keep trash and food put up and out of the way. Coyotes will still be around, but shouldn't bother you or your wife, except for an occassional visit to check out the chicken pot pie and eggs benedict.

    Just my 2 cents.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    If a local trapper is not an option you can silence a .22 LR pretty effectively with a balloon stretched over the muzzle. Reduces the report to a loud pop.

    Also consider reinforcing your coop with some heavier screen over top of the chickenwire
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    If a local trapper is not an option you can silence a .22 LR pretty effectively with a balloon stretched over the muzzle. Reduces the report to a loud pop.
    Definatly gonna try that!
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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