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Thread: any shooting berger VLD for hunting

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    Default any shooting berger VLD for hunting

    I have been thinking about using berger bullets on my sheep hunt and was wondering if anyone here has them before. I know for sheep they will be fine, but i will also be in grizz country and wonder how they would penatrate on something bigger. I have seen blacks shot with them and they drop in there tracks. Anyone have any other hunting experences with them. It would not be used for moose, just a montain rifle bullet.

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    I don't recall the details, but I'm pretty sure someone filed a report about taking game with them last year. It was in a 308 Winchester if I recall correctly, and reaching further I think he swore them off. You might noodle around in the archives, because I'm pretty sure Berger VLD was in the title line.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swapdonkey View Post
    I have been thinking about using berger bullets on my sheep hunt and was wondering if anyone here has them before. I know for sheep they will be fine, but i will also be in grizz country and wonder how they would penatrate on something bigger. I have seen blacks shot with them and they drop in there tracks. Anyone have any other hunting experences with them. It would not be used for moose, just a montain rifle bullet.
    I've shot several whitetails with them (.264 140 grain @ ±2800 fps MV) and have no complaints. Using good shot placement they were very effective. FWIW, I shot a doe several years ago and killed another doe standing behind her--same bullet. The second deer was fairly small, but the single VLD gave complete penetration on both animals. The first doe was a DRT and the second deer made it just a few leaps. That's pretty significant terminal performance IMO.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    I, too, used them on deer with great effectiveness with my -06. Don't know about bigger game, but for sheep it should do well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I don't recall the details, but I'm pretty sure someone filed a report about taking game with them last year. It was in a 308 Winchester if I recall correctly, and reaching further I think he swore them off. You might noodle around in the archives, because I'm pretty sure Berger VLD was in the title line.
    I'm pretty sure that the person who used the Berger 308 on a deer was Murphy. If I recall correctly the wound was significant. I use Berger hunting bullets for target practice and, so far, they have been the most accurate that I have loaded for my 308 target rifle. Last year when I got heavily into reloading my own ammo I emailed Walt Berger and asked about bullet weights for deer, black bear, and brown bear and asked if there was enough penetration. If I remember correctly...for deer he recommended the 155-168 grain, for black bear he said to move up to the 175 grain, and for brown bear to use the 190 or the 210 grain bullet. Although I can surf the web fine right now, my email program is on the fritz. If I can get into my email and find his response I'll post it. Oh, another thing, the target bullets have a heavier jacket and are not designed to expand where the hunting bullets are designed to fragment. There is no difference between the inherent accuracy between the two versions, so I started with the hunting bullets and I'm staying with them.

    From the Berger site...
    The Hunting bullet line is proving to be the most lethal big game hunting bullets available. All of our Hunting bullets are made in the VLD design. The VLD design incorporates a sharp nose that allows the bullet to penetrate 2” to 3” before it starts to expand. After the bullet starts to expand it will shed 40 to 85% of its weight as shrapnel into the surrounding tissue (internal organ). The combination between the shrapnel and the hydrostatic shock produces a massive wound cavity within the vital area (internal organs) that will be 13” to 15” long. This massive wound cavity results in the animal dropping fast since most go into shock after such a tremendous blow. Those animals that don’t go down immediately will soon succumb to blood pressure loss and/or organ failure producing a quick ethical kill. Our bullets don't poke through like an arrow (high weight retention, deep penetration bullets) but instead dump their energy where it is most effective, inside the animal. Using the Berger VLD will result in an animal that goes down fast so you can enjoy the results of your hunt without having to track the wounded animal after the shot.

    Hope that helps.

    MyTime

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    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Here's a thread posted not long ago. Might help you while you consider your direction.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ghlight=berger

    With the wide choice of bullets available, I would choose a different one, but that's my choice.

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    after looking around at different boards and this one I have decided to stay with the 150 barnes TTSX. I shoot them out of the 338-06 and love them.

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