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Thread: Need info on boating the Sag

  1. #1
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    Default Need info on boating the Sag

    Can anyone advise or refer me to former posts on putting in the Sag at the Pump Sta and hunting caribou. I have a Sportjon and am a fairly experienced boater, but I don't want to get into anything too hairball. Is it possible to get 5 mi from the haul road where rifle hunting is permitted? We can bowhunt as well, but prefer rifle if possible.
    Thanks, Don Turner

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    i belive you need to get to the ivashak and up it a little ways to get out of the 5 miles i could be wrong but was checking out the same thing,theres a picture at compeaus taken on the ivashak with a sport john with carbiou,a sheep and a grizzly so its doable just keep an eye on the water level, craig

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    Go to this thread you can find alot about it. Haul Road Report Thread

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    I've made the trip three times. It's a long haul and you need to plan for the worst. The problem with launching in the Sag is water level. Plan on launching empty and dry into about a foot or two of water. I found going up river fairly easy, but coming down you can quickly get into shallow braids if you miss a turn. The Ivashak is 5 miles off the corridor, and the Sag gets that far away, in spots. Just carry a GPS and track the road twenty miles south of the launch and your track on the river to be certain. This trip is not an easy venture but can be done. Keep in mind you are on the slope and weather can go from clear and sunny to socked in and blowing rain and snow in a matter of hours. I recommend you camp upstream and depending on when you go, the animals can be thick or scattered.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    With a jet boat and rifle you really only have one good option and that is the launch north of Pump Station 2. You can't miss it unless there is a huge fog bank, it will be on your right with about 25 to 50 rigs parked off the road about 500 yards or so. You will pull down onto a gravel bar and you will see where everyone is off/on loading. Empty your boat as best you can. Back rapidly into the water, slam on the breaks, and let your boat slide into the water. The other option is to back into the water, stop, and use a HiLow jack between you trailer winch and the front of your boat and jack off into the Sag. Both ways work depending on your skills.

    Once in the Sag you can load up your boat. You will have between 25 and 50 yards (depending on the year and water level) of knee deep water to get on step in. You will hug the right bank as you head north for a mile or two. Use a GPS! About 4 to 5 miles up stream there will be a river coming into the Sag on the left called the Ivashak...it will look like another of the many braids in the river. If you miss it you will make a pretty big right hand turn and head straight to the back of Pump 2...you have gone to far, turn around and head down stream and the Ivashak is much easier to see when you are headed down stream. About 3 miles or so up the Ivashak you will be into the rifle area...you will start seeing more and more boats. When you get to the bluffs you will see lots of camp sites which are almost exclusively rifle hunters.

    Most common mistakes people make...leaving the launch without adequate gear if you break down, over loading a boat, not being prepared to make repairs on a sand bar, not being prepare to drag your boat off a sand bar (come-alongs are great). Most common thing to break, a jet foot and/or stomp grate. Not many boats sink, but every year there seems to be at least one air boat get upside down. These are dangerous rivers if you are not prepared. A lot of fun to run if you can read water and use your head.

    Chances of rain are better in August, which is good as the water level goes up. Bugs too are increased. The later into September, the more chances of cold and or snow...bad for water levels. Watching the water level and weather is a must every day.

    Caribou migrate through this area all the time. When they are there, you may see hundreds...when they are not you could go a week to 10 days without seeing any. Lots of Grayling and Char fishing, so take a pole or two. Tons of migratory birds, so a camera is a must. Two or three family herds of Muskox too. Moose are starting to make a come back. Lots of Griz in which you can bag one every year.

    Hope that helps some.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Roger45,
    Why do you think they are flipping the airboats?
    BK
    PS- Great post, valuable info.

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    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkmail View Post
    Roger45,
    Why do you think they are flipping the airboats?
    BK
    PS- Great post, valuable info.
    Wind can be a big issue if you are not prepared for it on these rivers. Airboats can be top heavy and they do flip. Jetboats like to rip off the jet foot and/or split the bottom open on a "hull inspector" (a 10 ton can opener rock 1 inch below the surface).

    I have never seen any bad "sweepers" on these rivers as there are not a lot of trees to fall over. Biggest issue is a 10 foot deep channel can braid out into a dozen channels only a couple of inches deep around the next turn...that is why it is good to know how to read rivers.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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