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Thread: Pier Spacing

  1. #1

    Default Pier Spacing

    Building a 24 x 24 cabin (2x6) with a 12/12 roof and wanted to get some input on the foundation. The foundation will be built on sonotubes, 6x10 beams on the piers and 2x8's for the floor joists. Those are what I believe makes sense but... The spacing and size of the tubes is what I am wanting to figure out.

    I would like 3 rows but that span between rows seems pretty long. Any suggestions on spacing or a source for calculating spacing?

    Thanks
    Glenn

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    2x8's aren't going to cut it on a 12' span, even at 16"o.c. You will be better served with 2x10's. It will be cheaper to change to 2x10's than to put in a fourth row of piers. I don't have my book at home for the beams, but I will take a look for tomorrow. Where are you getting 6x10's? They aren't really common up here. SBS stocks 6x12's in 12' and 16' lengths.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the suggestion. I did not realize 6x10's were not common here so I will go with the 6x12. If it were you would you go with two runs of 16' and one 12' so the butts do not line up or not worry about it?

    Thanks

  4. #4

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    Doug - what would you recommend for the spacing with three rows? I am thinking one at 12' and the outside two at 18" in from edge. Four piers per row, 10" diameter.

    Thanks for your time
    Glenn

  5. #5
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Just a note - Everything is easier and cheaper if you go to 20 or even 16 wide. The foundation and roof are the most expensive. Longer lengths are harder to work with and more expensive. Price out JCI/BCIs for the floor joists. Be sure to check Craigslist.

    Mike
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    Bill Hicks

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The answer is going to be one of two things depending on how you build the roof. If you use a load bearing ridge beam the snow load will be reduced on the outside eave end walls VS. If you go with a truss design that carries the snow load all the way out to the outside walls. I also don't know where you are building this, so I am figuring it with my local Talkeetna snowload of 100#/sqft. I am using two floors at 40#/sq ft. Another variable is if you are building the floor on top of the beams or hanging it between them. Building on top will give you the additional 2x10 above the beam to help carry the load.

    In scenario number 1 you will need three rows at 8' on center, in scenario number two they are going to need to be 6' apart using a 6x12 fir beam.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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